Comes To Shove

The iconic Porsche 911 had been around a long time before the Yuppies embraced it as the ultimate status symbol in the 1980s, but by the time they had finished with it, Porsche ownership in the minds of the motoring public would forever be associated with balding middle aged men hurtling towards a mid-life crisis with an too-healthy bank account.

Car enthusiasts however know better of course and can see past the car as a rich person's plaything, because the 911 was and still is one of the most capable sports coupes of all time, the Turbo being the ultimate expression of the design. Tamiya have a long tradition of creating high quality kits of classic Porsches, so the release of the 1988 Turbo was a very welcome addition to the range.

I have loved Porsches since I was old enough to distinguish one car from another, I think mainly because of their engine sound, but also because they just look so funky, and slightly odd in a cool way. I have wanted to build a classic pumped up turbo car from the 1970s or '80s and paint it orange with black wheels, because I like this look (just like a big kid), so when this kit arrived it became the ideal victim for the treatment. The model is actually based upon Tamiya's 1987 release of the 911 Turbo Flatnose, a car that strayed from the classic 911 look by removing the characteristic frog eyes, and for me at least it just did not look right. The new kit uses the chassis and interior tub plus wipers etc., but features a newly tooled bodyshell, and this looks spot on in proportion and detail.

This is the first car model I have built for quite some time, so it took a little while to get back into the swing of things, not to mention finding the materials necessary for this type of work! O

Model and words by Marcus Nicholls.

"Tamiya have a long tradition of creating high quality kits of classic Porsches, so the release of the 1988 Turbo was a very welcome addition to the range"

ABOVE: The bodyshell may be all new, but the questionable method of fixing the mirrors dates back to the 1987 kit - the fit is not good.

ABOVE: To remedy this, the hole was filled with plastic card scraps cut into wedges and pressed firmly into place.

ABOVE: Grip Thin CA was then flowed into and around the wedges, fixing them firmly in place, followed by a blast of activator to set the glue.

ABOVE: The bodyshell may be all new, but the questionable method of fixing the mirrors dates back to the 1987 kit - the fit is not good.

ABOVE: To remedy this, the hole was filled with plastic card scraps cut into wedges and pressed firmly into place.

ABOVE: Grip Thin CA was then flowed into and around the wedges, fixing them firmly in place, followed by a blast of activator to set the glue.

ABOVE: To hold the mirror's brass wired base steady, a channel was made on each side of the inner body using scraps of plastic card.

ABOVE: The result isn't perfect, but it's a lot more realistic than the peg-in-a-hole approach. The mirrors were painted off the car and fitted at the end.

Porsche Classic Models

Porsche Classic Models

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